Bike Insurance – Cycling Fan http://www.cyclingfan.org/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 09:56:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.cyclingfan.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Bike Insurance – Cycling Fan http://www.cyclingfan.org/ 32 32 Edelweiss General Insurance Introduces Switch “Pay as you Drive” Supplemental Car Insurance Suite http://www.cyclingfan.org/edelweiss-general-insurance-introduces-switch-pay-as-you-drive-supplemental-car-insurance-suite/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 09:56:00 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/edelweiss-general-insurance-introduces-switch-pay-as-you-drive-supplemental-car-insurance-suite/ Edelweiss General Insurance (EGI) has launched the Switch ‘Pay as you Drive’ (PAYD) add-on for private vehicle owners. EGI launched Switch 2.0 earlier in July this year and is the first offering of its kind that combines “pay as you drive and pay how you drive”. The Switch Pay-As-You-Drive add-on coverage allows customers to earn […]]]>

Edelweiss General Insurance (EGI) has launched the Switch ‘Pay as you Drive’ (PAYD) add-on for private vehicle owners. EGI launched Switch 2.0 earlier in July this year and is the first offering of its kind that combines “pay as you drive and pay how you drive”. The Switch Pay-As-You-Drive add-on coverage allows customers to earn an attractive discount on their Damage Damage (OD) premium based on their annual usage in terms of distance driven. EGI launched Switch two years ago with the add-on feature, and this product can be added as an add-on to existing car insurance products. The premium will be invoiced according to the kilometers traveled by car.

Commenting on the launch, Shanai Ghosh, Executive Director and CEO of Edelweiss General Insurance, said, “We have always believed that usage-based insurance has huge potential in India. We have been working on this concept since 2020 and have launched 2 products on the same concept under the sandbox of IRDAI The recent directive from the regulator on the Motor OD add-on testifies to our conviction and we are extremely happy and proud to be the precursors by proposing concepts so innovative to customers. We have many more products in the pipeline to strengthen this soon-to-be-launched portfolio.”

The new add-on functionality is in line with IRDAI guidelines allowing general insurance companies to introduce technology concepts for vehicle damage (OD) coverage. EGI says its new insurance add-on has been enabled with telematics and app-based products. Currently, with a regular car policy, there was no difference in the premium paid by the customer who uses their vehicle sparingly as opposed to a heavy duty vehicle owner who drives more miles each year.

The Pay as you Drive (PAYD) add-on offers customers three Personal Damage coverage slab options – up to 5,000 km; 5,000 to 7,500 km; and 7,500-10,000 km per year. Customers can choose the tile that best suits their use based on their annual consumption. Depending on the usage declared by the customer, EGI will realize additional savings on the premium. The company claims that customers will be able to save up to 25% on their premium with this add-on. If the annual car usage exceeds the chosen slab, the customer can purchase additional coverage for the additional usage.

According to EGI, the Switch PAYD option is ideal for those working in hybrid or home environments. It also helps vehicle owners who have company-provided transportation or who regularly use public transportation. It also helps those who drive fewer miles with their second vehicle.

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Ventura Police Arrest Homicide Suspect, Hueneme Hazmat Cleanup, More News – InsuranceNewsNet http://www.cyclingfan.org/ventura-police-arrest-homicide-suspect-hueneme-hazmat-cleanup-more-news-insurancenewsnet/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:10:07 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/ventura-police-arrest-homicide-suspect-hueneme-hazmat-cleanup-more-news-insurancenewsnet/ Here is a roundup of recent incidents and announcements from Ventura County agencies: Police arrest homicide suspect VENTURA — Police arrested the suspect in a Ventura knife attack Tuesday night that killed a 26-year-old man three days earlier. The stabbings took place around 2:01 p.m. Saturday on a bike path located west of Victoria Avenue […]]]>

Here is a roundup of recent incidents and announcements from Ventura County agencies:

Police arrest homicide suspect

VENTURA — Police arrested the suspect in a Ventura knife attack Tuesday night that killed a 26-year-old man three days earlier.

The stabbings took place around 2:01 p.m. Saturday on a bike path located west of Victoria Avenue across the street from Montalvo Hill Parkaccording to Ventura Police Department.

The victim, identified as Marcos Guzman Reyes, 26, of Ventura, was found with multiple stab wounds to his upper torso. He was transported to Ventura County Medical Center where he succumbed to his injuries, authorities said.

Through an investigation, police determined that Reyes was stabbed while standing next to his bicycle on the bike path. The suspect, identified as Pedro Munoz39, from Ventura, fled the area on foot and drove through Victoria in Montalvo Hill Park. He escaped through a nearby mall and was last seen in the Montalvo area.

Around 5:30 p.m. Tuesdaya Ventura patrolman spotted a man who matched Munoz’s physical description in the dead end of Valentine’s Road to the east of Victoria Avenue. Munoz attempted to flee and fought the officer, but was arrested within minutes and taken into custody.

Munoz was incarcerated in the Ventura County Jail on suspicion of murder, felony assault on a police officer and various drug misdemeanor charges. His bail was set at $1.36 millionand it must appear in Ventura Superior Court for indictment at 1:30 p.m. Thursdayaccording to online prison records.

Hazmat teams called in for acid spill

PORT HUENEME – Hazardous materials crews responded to a chemical spill on a road in Port Hueneme on Tuesday evening.

A 911 caller reported a truck dropping something near the intersection of Pleasant Valley Road and Ventura Road shortly after. 6:30 p.m.said Andy VanScivera Ventura County Fire Department spokesperson.

Firefighters, who dubbed the response the Valley Incident, provided a standard response, including crews from Oxnard Fire and Ventura County Fire Departments.

Officials determined the spill was a type of acid. About a third of a gallon was contained and neutralized. No injuries or environmental damage were reported, VanSciver said.

The crews were evacuated from the scene to 9 p.m.

Man killed by train identified

CAMARILLO — A man hit and killed by a train Monday night in Camarillo was identified Tuesday.

The victim, Agustin Villalpando Jr.., 53, was described as homeless, according to the Ventura County Medical Examiner’s Office. His death was ruled accidental.

On Monday, Villalpando was hit by a freight train near the Camarillo Subway Station by Lewis Roadaccording to Ventura County Sheriff’s Office. Trains were stopped in both directions for several hours while deputies investigated.

Villalpando died at the scene from blunt-force head injuries, officials said.

Man pleads guilty to hazardous fuel waste and fraud

A Van Nuys man involved in February 2020 Oxnard hit-and-run accident that also caused the hazardous waste cleanup pleaded guilty last week to charges stemming from the incident.

Karen Khosteghyan, 37, changed her guilty plea to Ventura County Superior Court for felony insurance fraud, hazardous waste disposal and hit-and-run driving, according to the Ventura County Attorney’s Office.

Khosteghyan was driving with a 500-gallon tank of diesel fuel in his truck bed on Feb. 1, 2020, when he was involved in a collision in Oxnard, according to the district attorney’s office.

He fled the scene, driving his truck to Camarillo, leaking diesel fuel from the tank until he abandoned it. The tank continued to leak in Camarillo, the agency said. Ventura County Fire Department investigators estimate that 130 gallons of fuel had leaked.

When the Oxnard Police Department contacted Khostegyhyan, he claimed his truck was stolen and he was not driving when the accident happened. He then filed a claim on his automobile insurance policy, issued by Kemper Insurance.

In an investigation by Oxnard Police, County Fire Department, Kemper Insurance and the District Attorney’s Auto Insurance Fraud Unit uncovered Khostegyhyan’s ruse. He is responsible for unlawfully causing a hazardous substance release, claiming his truck was stolen, and making a false insurance claim.

Khosteghyan is due to appear for sentencing August 22 at 1:30 p.m. in courtroom 23.

He faces up to five years and a fine of up to $50,000 or double the amount of the fraud, whichever is greater, for auto insurance fraud and up to three years in prison and a fine of $10,000 to deposit hazardous waste on the road.

Jeremy Childs is a news and general assignment reporter for the Ventura County Star. He can be reached at 805-437-0208, [email protected]and on Twitter @Jeremy_Childs.

Cytlalli Salgado is a breaking news reporter for the Ventura County Star. She can be reached by calling 805-437-0257 or emailing [email protected].

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What cycling and practicing cannabis law have in common http://www.cyclingfan.org/what-cycling-and-practicing-cannabis-law-have-in-common/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 23:33:47 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/what-cycling-and-practicing-cannabis-law-have-in-common/ In late 2018, my esteemed partner, Whitt Steineker, recruited me to join the newly formed Cannabis Industry team. At that time, groups in Mississippi were actively seeking signatures to put together a ballot initiative for a medical cannabis program. Seeing the opportunities for me and my business and understanding that if this initiative were to […]]]>

In late 2018, my esteemed partner, Whitt Steineker, recruited me to join the newly formed Cannabis Industry team. At that time, groups in Mississippi were actively seeking signatures to put together a ballot initiative for a medical cannabis program. Seeing the opportunities for me and my business and understanding that if this initiative were to ultimately pass, being one of the first participants in such an exciting, interesting and unique industry in Mississippi seemed fun and rewarding, so I put on my jersey and joined the team.

Shortly after deciding to join Bradley’s cannabis industry team, I also decided it was finally time for me to implement some real and meaningful form of exercise into my life. Running hurt my ankles and knees. I never liked lifting weights and was intimidated by CrossFit. So my nearly decade-old hybrid bike seemed like a good place to start. As the 10 mile runs turned into 20 mile and then 30 mile runs, I realized this was a form of exercise I could do and actually enjoy. This culminated in buying a real road bike at the end of 2019 and, although I said I never would, I did it all – spandex and all. Now, over 10,000 miles later on this road bike, and after several centuries or other gran fondo rides, I’m totally hooked.

As you can imagine, these long drives leave me plenty of time to think about a lot of things. Recently, while riding, it occurred to me that my experiences developing a cannabis law practice and getting into cycling share many similarities. Let me explain.

Be ready for the unexpected and overcome it

Mississippi’s path to legalizing and rolling out its medical cannabis program has been anything but predictable. I challenge anyone who says they anticipated the high level of voter support for Initiative 65 only for the state Supreme Court to strike down that constitutional amendment because Mississippi’s ballot initiative process is “broken.” Supermajority Legislative Support [VS4] of the Medical Cannabis Act shocked many. And the rollout of the medical cannabis program presented potholes and the need to alter the original route.

We have seen regulations that were still in the “proposed” stage when the application portal went live for non-dispensary applications, and then released the final regulations. These online applications requested information that many had not anticipated based on regulations and the law. Then some sections of the app were changed and some categories of information were removed.

These unforeseen events resemble some I have encountered on the road. In my nearly three years of riding the roads of Madison, Hinds, and Rankin counties and other parts of Mississippi and the South, I’ve dealt with more flat tires than I care to admit; unexpected, long patches of gravel or very rutted roads; motorists not so happy; the bridges being out; chasing dogs that appear out of nowhere; and bonking and needing a ride home.

Being able to assess unforeseen circumstances, make informed decisions, pivot and follow a course of action is a must in both a cannabis law practice and in cycling. I have had many opportunities to follow these steps in both companies and feel that my preparations have led to a smoother path.

Surround yourself with the right people

Let’s be realistic. Legal cannabis is relatively new to the Southeast and brand new to Mississippi, so we knew we had our work cut out at the start. In addition to my and my colleagues’ deep dive into the nuances and challenges that a cannabis law practice presents and constant monitoring of the ever-changing landscape, we deliberately began at the beginning of this practice to meet and to surround ourselves with people of all facets. Of the industry. We’ve spent hours attending conferences, meeting and talking to lawyers from other jurisdictions practicing in this space, meeting people from the cannabis-related financial services and insurance industries, meeting with various consultants, exploring opportunities commercial group and recruited Bradley lawyers who had established practices in the many areas in which cannabis businesses would need assistance (e.g., business formation/organization, real estate and zoning, banking and financial services, insurance coverage, etc.). insurance and intellectual property).

Cycling is no different. Early on, I developed relationships with good people at the local bike shop, joined a local cycling group, and grew my online cycling network through Strava. Whether those connections led to gear suggestions, better riding techniques, hydration and nutrition tips, or just helped motivate me to get on the bike and take the road, these contacts proved to be essential.

Don’t hesitate to get help

Surrounding yourself with a large network of people doesn’t do you much good unless you know when to put their knowledge to good use. Throughout my time in the cannabis law field, I have used my connections inside and outside the firm. When legal questions about real estate arise, for example, I call my real estate partner at Bradley to help me. When a zoning issue arises, I walk down the hall and talk to my partner who has experience handling zoning disputes for business owners versus municipalities in Mississippi. Similarly, when the cultivation application asked applicants to submit proof of insurance, although these applicants do not have a license to operate the business, not to mention some who do not even have facilities built , I call my contact in the insurance industry to help.

Knowing when to ask for help with cycling is also essential. There were several times when I overworked, overheated, or flattened out, but I was hours away from home. At times like these I would have to call my wife or a friend to pick me up or hop on YouTube (again) to watch a video showing how to replace a blown tube. Or there were other times when my bike didn’t feel right and caused discomfort, so I visited the bike shop and learned that my seat needed adjusting.

In both worlds, it was imperative that I recognize when a problem or circumstance arises that requires someone else’s help, and then lean on that help, which hopefully will me a better cannabis advocate and cyclist in the process.

Buckle up, saddle up and enjoy the ride

The practice of cannabis law and cycling share other similarities, but I’ve said way too much already, and it’s time to stop. In conclusion, however, I am grateful to have chosen these two paths. Entering the field of cannabis law has greatly expanded my network, introduced me to some truly fascinating, smart, and innovative people, and allowed me to play a role in helping shape and launch a whole new market in my home state. .

Besides the health benefits of cycling, this hobby has also allowed me to meet great people, showed me familiar parts of the state in a whole new way, and shown me unknown areas in my backyard – with all the sights, smells, and even tastes you can only experience on a bike (I swallowed way too many bugs).

Who knows exactly what the future holds for me when it comes to my cannabis and cycling law practice? No matter what, though, I’m confident I’ll keep riding with my eyes wide open, no matter if I have a tailwind pushing me or a headwind trying to hold me back.

© 2022 Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLPNational Law Review, Volume XII, Number 206

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Steve Scott of Ieuter Insurance cycles through Michigan http://www.cyclingfan.org/steve-scott-of-ieuter-insurance-cycles-through-michigan/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 09:08:23 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/steve-scott-of-ieuter-insurance-cycles-through-michigan/ Steve Scott of Ieuter Insurance Group plans to pedal hard as he joins the Wish-A-Mile Bicycle Tour, a 300-mile cycling circuit from Traverse City to Marshall. The 35th annual Wish-A-Mile Bike Ride, which runs July 28-31, is the largest fundraising event for the Michigan chapter, started in 1987 with four friends who challenged themselves to […]]]>

Steve Scott of Ieuter Insurance Group plans to pedal hard as he joins the Wish-A-Mile Bicycle Tour, a 300-mile cycling circuit from Traverse City to Marshall.

The 35th annual Wish-A-Mile Bike Ride, which runs July 28-31, is the largest fundraising event for the Michigan chapter, started in 1987 with four friends who challenged themselves to ride 300 miles from Canton to Mackinac. Affectionately known as WAM, this event has continued to grow from those humble beginnings into an incredible, heartwarming journey of dedicated riders and volunteers who are granting transformational wishes for Michigan children struggling with life-threatening illnesses.


“I wish the kids were some of the bravest, kindest kids you know,” Scott said. “I ride and raise funds so Michigan’s most deserving children and their families can experience the happiness, relief, and renewal that a wish can bring.”

Scott said a friend’s participation in the Wish-A-Mile program inspired him to start working out. The longest ride he had done before training for this event was a two-day, 200-mile bike trip from Seattle to Portland.

“It was 120 miles the first day and 80 the second,” Scott said. “A friend and I spent the night in a gym with 100 other guys and it was miserable. Never again!”

This time around, he’s enjoying the fully catered options provided by the Make-A-Wish team, which offers full meals, aid stations, doctors and massage therapists along the route, and can carry gear for cyclists so that they can ride without hindrance. .

The 300-mile route Scott will take runs from Traverse City to Big Rapids on Day 1, Big Rapids to Grand Ledge on Day 2, and Grand Ledge to Marshall on Day 3. There are also shorter routes, including a 50- one kilometer trip.

Scott said he is thrilled to work for a company so committed to supporting the community and encourages staff members to engage in volunteer efforts. Not only did his teammates at Ieuter Insurance Group pledge their support, but their partners at Michigan Insurance donated $1,000 in Scott’s name.

“We’re lucky,” Scott said. “We live in a great community and the community supports us, and it’s important to give back. It’s hard to find a better cause than Make-A-Wish. It’s something you can really support.

Those who want to support the cause and support Scott’s run as a sponsor can visit makeawishmichigan.donordrive.com/participant/Steve-Scott. As of July 8, Scott’s supporters had pledged nearly $2,400 and more than $1,145,605 had been raised from all Michigan runners.

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Children more likely to be hospitalized due to dirt bikes than quads: study http://www.cyclingfan.org/children-more-likely-to-be-hospitalized-due-to-dirt-bikes-than-quads-study/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 12:23:18 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/children-more-likely-to-be-hospitalized-due-to-dirt-bikes-than-quads-study/ New You can now listen to the Insurance Journal articles! Motorcycles cause a much higher injury rate in children than quads, a study by UNSW Sydney and NeuRA found, but quads represent more serious individual injuries. In a retrospective population-based study conducted by UNSW and its medical research affiliates NeuRA and The George Institute, study […]]]>
New You can now listen to the Insurance Journal articles!

Motorcycles cause a much higher injury rate in children than quads, a study by UNSW Sydney and NeuRA found, but quads represent more serious individual injuries.

In a retrospective population-based study conducted by UNSW and its medical research affiliates NeuRA and The George Institute, study authors reviewed all records of children aged 0-16 admitted to NSW hospitals between 2001 and 2018 for injuries sustained off-road. motorcycle or quad accident. [Editor’s note: The study was conducted in New South Wales, Australia].

Published in the journal Injury Prevention, the research noted that 6,624 crashes resulted in hospitalizations during this time, of which 5,156 (78%) involved motorcycles (including dirt bikes, trail bikes and other motorcycles off-road) and 1,468 (22%) involving quads. bicycles.

Looking at the type of injuries suffered by children, there were clear differences between the two-wheeled and four-wheeled varieties. Motorcyclists were more likely to have lower extremity injuries, but less likely to have head, neck, abdomen or chest injuries than quad riders. Quad riders on average had higher injury severity, with longer hospital stays.

Tragically, there were 10 fatalities during the study period – six on motorcycles and four on quads.

The study’s lead author, Dr Chris Mulligan, is an orthopedic physician at Sydney Children’s Hospital and a researcher affiliated with UNSW Medicine & Health and NeuRA. He said he and his fellow researchers wanted to measure and distinguish differences between ATV and dirt bike injuries in children – something that had never been done before at the population level.

“Our results confirm policy changes over the past 10 years regarding quads after various coroner’s inquests and media attention, but the high number of hospitalizations we saw also indicate that consideration should be given more attention to motorcycles,” said Dr Mulligan.

Focus on two-wheelers

As a practicing clinician, Dr. Mulligan has seen his fair share of children present with serious injuries from both motorcycles and quads. With nearly four times more hospitalizations for motorcycle injuries than quad bikes, he and his fellow researchers are calling for greater attention to injury prevention for two-wheeled riders.

“We know that over the past 10 years there has been a lot of research done, particularly on vehicle risk factors in quads,” Dr Mulligan said.

“A lot of good work has been done at UNSW when it comes to stability testing and other vehicle-based design changes to quads, but we haven’t had the same level of research for bikes to two wheels.

“While the best practice advice for quads is not to recommend their use for children under 16, this may not be practical for motorcycles. Further effort is needed to find ways to minimize the risk to children using motorcycles for recreation or on family farms.

More data needed

But could it be that there are more motorcycle injuries because there are more motorcycles?

UNSW Health & Medicine Associate Professor Julie Brown, co-director of NeuRA’s Transurban Road Safety Center, said that while we don’t know for sure, that’s a reasonable assumption.

“It is likely that more children are using motorbikes and that is why we are seeing more hospitalizations among children who use them. The popularity of these vehicles over quads also indicates the need to find ways to minimize the damage associated with this activity,” she said.

“To better understand this, we would need to know how many vehicles there are in circulation. And because dirt bikes and quads are unregistered and off public roads, it’s not possible to know how many kids are riding, for how long, and over what period.

This will be the subject of further study in which the group is involved.

“We want to engage with industry and other groups and have access to sales data, which would allow us to define what the baseline level of exposure to these vehicles is and what the risk factors are.

“Working cooperatively with young cyclists and their families, riding organizations, farmer groups and industry bodies will be essential to developing effective and acceptable injury prevention measures,” said Associate Professor Brown. .

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REI prepares to enter Glenwood Springs outdoor retail market http://www.cyclingfan.org/rei-prepares-to-enter-glenwood-springs-outdoor-retail-market/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 01:43:00 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/rei-prepares-to-enter-glenwood-springs-outdoor-retail-market/ Veteran REI employee Forrest Jarvi trains new employees on various footwear at the Glenwood Springs store set to open July 22.Chelsea Independent/Post Independent A week and a day before its official opening, the new REI Co-op store in south Glenwood Springs looks like an outdoor teaching lab. Near the front of the 20,300 square foot […]]]>
Veteran REI employee Forrest Jarvi trains new employees on various footwear at the Glenwood Springs store set to open July 22.
Chelsea Independent/Post Independent

A week and a day before its official opening, the new REI Co-op store in south Glenwood Springs looks like an outdoor teaching lab.

Near the front of the 20,300 square foot Roaring Fork Marketplace space that once housed Office Depot (3216 S. Glen Ave., Suite A), a group of new REI employees learn to instruct and help customers to buy a suitable backpack.

Another group at the back of the store looks at the different shoe brands; another learns to match customers with the right mountain bike and accessories; another learns everything there is to know about camping gear; ditto for paddle sports.



The front counter is lined with future cashiers who are training in the computer system.

On Wednesday, employees will take part in a “Friends and Family Night” trial run to practice their newly learned customer service and sales skills. The store opens with a three-day grand opening celebration Friday-Sunday, July 22-24, including giveaways and an outdoor social from 1-5 p.m. each afternoon with music and an outdoor gear festival featuring many brands.



It’s all part of REI’s hands-on, “see, feel, touch” approach to outfitting its customers which, according to new Glenwood Springs store manager Jace Harms, sets REI apart in the retail industry from outdoor recreation.

The new REI Co-op store is scheduled to open in Glenwood Springs Friday through Sunday July 22-24.

“It’s part of our heritage as an outdoor outfitter, to really work to serve everyone who comes through the doors, and we put that into action every day,” said Harms, who has been employed by the co-op. owned by members for four years. years.

The Nebraska native joined the company after moving to Dallas about 10 years ago. He worked at the Dallas flagship store before jumping at the chance to manage the new Glenwood Springs store.

“It was an opportunity for me to get a little closer to home and where I grew up, while still providing that outdoor playground that we all enjoy,” Harms said. “This community continues to embrace me and remind me of the small rural town where I grew up, and it’s refreshing to be in a community where you know people’s names and can get involved and give back to the community. “

Already since arriving in March, Harms said he has volunteered for a Roaring Fork Outdoor Volunteers (RFOV) trail work crew in the Red Hill Trails area of ​​Carbondale.

RFOV was also one of four local organizations to benefit from the first round of REI Gives grants, totaling $20,000. The others were the Wilderness Workshop, the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association and Gay for Good.

Hiring

Glenwood Springs REI store manager Jace Harms, center, listens during a training session for new employees on backpacks at the new store which will open on July 22.

The Glenwood Springs store, due to its small size compared to urban flagship stores, and due to its location as a gateway to outdoor recreation, is classified as a “gateway” store.

It is similar in size and product categories to REI stores in

Dillon, which opened in 2017, and the Grand Junction store, which opened in 2000, then moved and expanded a few years ago.

Surprisingly, although hiring the 45-54 staff needed to run the Glenwood store has been difficult in the region’s tight labor market, Harms said they are currently at 41 employees.

“One of the things that has kept me with REI is that at the center of everything we do is people,” he said. “We value and pride ourselves on taking care of our employees at every turn. So responding to the local hiring climate, to make sure we present ourselves competitively, is part of that.

REI also emphasizes local hiring among existing outdoor enthusiasts as much as possible, as it is the resident experts who are best placed to provide advice on where to go locally to recreate, and what type of equipment is the best, Harms said.

“Whether it’s trying a new activity or hitting a familiar trail or waterway, we aspire to be at the center of people’s outdoor life for products and expertise,” a- he declared.

Incentives for employees include a one-time $300 signing bonus and a paid day off from day one so they can get out and recreate, Harms said. And, company-wide from 2023, there will no longer be a minimum hours requirement for employees to receive health insurance benefits, he said.

REI Glenwood is always looking for full-time and part-time Retail Sales Associates; information about the REI Job Page.

Outdoor commercial cohabitation

Harms said REI knows it’s not the ultimate outdoor gear solution, especially in smaller communities that already have an established outdoor culture.

While the new REI store offers gear and apparel for hiking, camping, paddling, cycling, running, fitness and snow sports, as well as a specialty bike and ski/snowboard store for adjusting and repairing equipment, there are niches that still fall to others.

“We have every intention when a customer says ‘oh you don’t have escalation’ or ‘you don’t have that brand’ we can say ‘no, but you know who does, it’s Summit Canyon, or Treadz, or Hookers, or Sunlight, or Factory Outdoor,” Harms said.

Summit Canyon Mountaineering store manager Emma Hunnicutt said it was important to have an established presence and a loyal customer base.

“As for the addition of REI, we look to the future with optimism and are continually grateful for the support of our residents, who are like family to us,” she said.

Hunnicutt noted that Summit Canyon has been equipping locals and visitors for outdoor adventures since 1978, “and we don’t plan on stopping anytime soon,” she said.

“We are excited to return to our roots and have been working on expanding our climbing and mountaineering departments, as well as offerings in just about every category,” Hunnicutt said. “Summit is more than just a store, it’s an essential part of the community.”

For REI’s part, Harms said the store had recently joined the Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association and hoped to connect to the business world in other ways.

“One of my goals is to meet with these business partners and see how we can support each other, whether it’s through stewardship and partnering to do a trail project or litter pick-ups, or whatever. “, said Harms.

When it comes to local outdoor recreation demand, with a large population base in the Roaring Fork Valley and Garfield County, and some 2.2 million tourists visiting the area each year, “We believe that there are plenty of outdoor activities for everyone,” he said.

REI also has more than 1.1 million lifetime cooperative members in Colorado.

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We are back! Visordown and Sorrymate Q&A return http://www.cyclingfan.org/we-are-back-visordown-and-sorrymate-qa-return/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:00:42 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/we-are-back-visordown-and-sorrymate-qa-return/ WE’RE back with another live stream with sorry my friend founder Fergus Dalgarno, July 27 at 7 p.m. This time we’ll be live on Instagram, and we want your legal questions and queries. sorry my friend is the motorcycle law firm created by bikers for bikers. They are specialists in an already specialized field and […]]]>

WE’RE back with another live stream with sorry my friend founder Fergus Dalgarno, July 27 at 7 p.m. This time we’ll be live on Instagram, and we want your legal questions and queries.

sorry my friend is the motorcycle law firm created by bikers for bikers. They are specialists in an already specialized field and focus on the type of cases that would confuse your average lawyer. They don’t just care about you, they care about your bike. We’ve all had that moment when we unhook and our first thought is “My bike!”.

Do you want to know if you have a case? You were driving as a passenger and had an accident? Wondering if you could challenge an insurer’s decision? Have you spilled a pothole, oil or fuel on the road?

In our last Q&A, we found out that you can claim an accident if you have no tax, no MOT and no insurance. [Ed note: once again, do not ride without these things.] That farmers are responsible for loose animals and potentially mud on the road. And if you’re not always at fault if you hit someone.

You can read the full list of questions and answers from our latest Q&A. But every situation is different, so contact us. DM us on Facebook and instagramor email Sam directly at sam.creedon-gray@visordown.com. If you’re feeling brave, you can ask us live… RSVP at the event to keep up to date.

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An airbag in your helmet? POC X AUTOLIV Integrated Helmet Airbag Concept Could Help Riders Stay Alive! http://www.cyclingfan.org/an-airbag-in-your-helmet-poc-x-autoliv-integrated-helmet-airbag-concept-could-help-riders-stay-alive/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 18:11:57 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/an-airbag-in-your-helmet-poc-x-autoliv-integrated-helmet-airbag-concept-could-help-riders-stay-alive/ The automobile and the bicycle have a tumultuous relationship, to say the least… which often turns out to be fatal for the cyclist. Good, POC Sports a leader in cycling and snow sports safety, and Autoliv, Inc., a leader in automotive safety systems, are looking to try and change the “deadly” part of that relationship. […]]]>

The automobile and the bicycle have a tumultuous relationship, to say the least… which often turns out to be fatal for the cyclist.

Good, POC Sports a leader in cycling and snow sports safety, and Autoliv, Inc., a leader in automotive safety systems, are looking to try and change the “deadly” part of that relationship. The two are teaming up in hopes of developing bicycle and e-bike helmets with built-in airbag technology that could help save the lives of cyclists.

POC and Autoliv collaboration

Photo c. COP

The press release says that “Head injuries alone account for half of fatal injuries among cyclists.” We already know that helmets are mostly beneficial for head safety if you were to crash on your own, but when a car is involved things are different. A Swedish insurance company has published a report which claims that “The absorption efficiency of the helmet could still be greatly improved, especially when collisions occur with a car at speeds above 20 km/h (12 mph).”

POC and Autoliv are exploring the potential for using airbag technology in helmets. The airbag, they say, would act as the initial energy absorber while the underlying helmet would be the secondary energy absorber.

POC and Autoliv collaboration

On the inside.

After a pre-study, Autoliv came to the conclusion that a bicycle helmet with the inclusion of an integrated airbag system can “significantly improve protection and reduce the impact of shocks on cyclists. The study also showed that the combination of the two absorbent technologies “allows a reduction in the maximum linear acceleration of the head and a significant reduction in head injuries during impact tests.” The pre-study showed that adding protection improvements (integrated airbag technology) could be done without compromising the design, comfort or weight of the helmet.

Dr. Cecillia Sunnevang, Vice President of Research at Autoliv, says: “Autoliv is committed to the vision of Saving More Lives and providing life-saving world-class solutions for mobility and society. The safety of vulnerable road users, such as cyclists and e-bike users, is one of our priorities. Therefore, it was natural to collaborate on this initiative with POC, a leader in cycling safety, to explore how to improve helmet protection in both current standard tests and more challenging scenarios, such as higher impact speeds. .

According to the press release, this same pre-study also showed that the addition of airbag technology to the top of the helmet contributed significantly to improved safety, especially in linear impacts. The release goes on to say that a cyclist’s risk of sustaining moderate (e.g. mild concussion) to fatal head injuries is estimated to be reduced by 80% to 30% during an impact at 20 km/h (12mph).

POC Airbag Helmet

The POC Airbag helmet in action perhaps?

POC Product Manager OscarHuss says, “Our the safety mission guides everything we do, and we always challenge conventional thinking to improve protection. Helmets are lab tested and certified and can never fully respond to all real-world variables of bicycle crashes. Together with Autoliv, which is world renowned and has some of the most advanced testing and research facilities in the field, we embarked on a development journey with airbag technology, asking ourselves what could be done to excel in today’s test scenarios and push the casing toward even more shock absorption capability”

The press release goes on to say that the number of environmentally conscious e-bike commuters hitting the roads around the world has grown rapidly. Saying that this rapid growth should be met by better helmet protection, especially at the higher speeds of e-bikes.

Autoliv and POC say they developed, during the pre-study, initial concepts using advanced simulation tools and conducted correlated crash tests. This will now lead to further testing and refinement in hopes of further developing the concept and bringing it to market.

Learn more about their findings here.

pocsports.com

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Everything You Need to Know About Denver’s Electric Bike Rebate Program http://www.cyclingfan.org/everything-you-need-to-know-about-denvers-electric-bike-rebate-program/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 02:04:27 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/everything-you-need-to-know-about-denvers-electric-bike-rebate-program/ Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to living in Colorado. For the locals, by the locals. Register today! Cycling purists – whether mountain, gravel, road or racing – generally agree on one thing: no motors. Recently, however, that mindset has started to change. In recent years, e-bikes, known as e-bikes, have become increasingly popular […]]]>

Cycling purists – whether mountain, gravel, road or racing – generally agree on one thing: no motors. Recently, however, that mindset has started to change. In recent years, e-bikes, known as e-bikes, have become increasingly popular on dirt trails and paved roads across the Centennial State, thanks to their ease of use and because they are relatively painless to maintain. There is, of course, another reason e-bikes are growing in popularity locally: the Mile High City is making owning a bike much cheaper.

In an effort to promote sustainability and improve downtown traffic congestion, Denver’s Office of Climate Action, Sustainability and Resilience (CASR) launched its e-bike rebate program in April . The three-year, tax-funded period discount program had been budgeted for $3 million in its first year, and is one of many climate action rebates offered by the city, including home energy upgrade discounts.

However, the discount was even more popular than expected, and the city suspended the program three weeks later, after distributing more than 3,000 vouchers to Denver residents to use at participating bike shops in the city. CASR has since restructured the application process to be fairer and to avoid reaching capacity limits too quickly again. The city is rolling out the program again starting July 11 on a first-come, first-served monthly basis, with 2,000 new coupons — typically for $400, but income-eligible residents can get $1,200 — available this this month, half of which will be reserved for income-eligible residents.

“The city’s rebate program has definitely boosted business,” says Sam Bagnall, general manager of RiNo’s Bike Source, which exclusively sells e-bikes. “We’ve had a ton of people with the first wave of vouchers, and we already have people knocking on doors asking about which one is coming in this week.”

Because questions seem to abound, we’ve put together this handy guide for e-bike curious Denverites who want to get in on the trend and the discounts.

2022 Coupon Release Dates

  • Monday July 11
  • monday august 1st
  • tuesday september 6
  • monday october 3
  • monday november 7
  • Monday, December 5

What are the different types of e-bikes and what qualifies for the discount?

To qualify for the city’s e-bike rebate voucher, a bike’s battery must be 750 watts or less. The bike cannot be gas powered and you cannot use the full suspension e-MTB discount.

Beyond that, Denver residents can use the discount for one of three main e-bike classifications: Class I, II, and III. Each variation has a battery and a motor.

  • Class I: e-bikes with pedal-assist motors that have a maximum speed of 20 miles per hour
  • Class II: e-bikes with throttle assist motors up to 20 mph; the throttle is usually a twist throttle, like on a motorcycle, or it can be a button on the handlebars
  • Class III: e-bikes that can go up to 28 miles per hour using either a pedal assist motor, a throttle, or both.

The main difference between the courses, says Zach Gordon, salesman at eBike USA, an e-bike shop in Cherry Creek, comes down to the help you need while riding. “Some of our bikes make you feel like you’re being pushed,” Gorden says, “while some of them just make you feel like you have stronger legs.”

Class I and Class II e-bikes are street legal and can be ridden anywhere around Denver, while Class III bikes have more restrictions due to their faster top speeds. For example, Class III e-bikes are not allowed on city bike paths, where the speed limit is 15 miles per hour. Fair warning: A speeding ticket on a bike path starts at $100.

Depending on battery size, e-bikes take around four to six hours to charge. A commuter-style e-bike, which has a more comfortable seating position, has a range of 40 to 60 miles before needing to be recharged. Road e-bikes can go even further on a single charge. Discounts can also be applied to e-cargo bikes, a larger style designed to carry extra passengers or extra things, like, say, groceries.

So what is the damage done to my wallet?

Prices can vary widely, but on average, the entry point for a standard e-bike is around $1,500. Prices for e-cargo bikes and more premium rides go up from there, with some high-end two-wheelers costing $3,000 or more.

The city’s program offers instant rebates of $400 to any Denver resident lucky enough to land a voucher; income-eligible residents who catch one will receive a $1,200 rebate. An additional $500 is available to eligible residents if they purchase a more expensive e-cargo bike.

What should I do if I am interested in buying an e-bike?

First, it helps to think about what you want to use an e-bike for. Are you going to use it for shopping and shopping? Are you going to go to work? Interested in trail running? “It’s important to specify the riding style you’re going to do,” Bagnall says. “It’s going to be very useful for stores to help you fine-tune models.”

The next step, naturally, is to go to a local e-bike shop and give it a try. In fact, the city is encouraging any Denver residents interested in an e-bike discount to give it a try at local stores before claiming one of the limited vouchers. Because while any additional research you can do yourself helps, Bagnall and Gordon both note that what looks good on paper may not feel good in the saddle. “Once you get in and get on the bike, that’s the best way to tell if it’s a good fit,” Gordon says. “Everyone is going to ride a little differently, it’s kind of person by person.”

Where can I buy an e-bike with a discount voucher?

The city has compiled a list of participating stores (see below) in the metro area where residents can redeem the discounts for purchasing an e-bike. Local stores have experienced occasional delays in receiving certain types of e-bikes due to supply chain issues, Gordon says. But overall, most stores are stocked with bikes and ready to sell them. “For all of our bikes, if you test them, you can ride them the same day. They are all ready to go,” he said. “In our showroom, what you see is what you get.”

How do I know if I am eligible for the discount?

Any Denver resident age 16 or older can apply for the rebate program; discounts are limited to one e-bike per person. All you need is proof of address in Denver i.e. bank statements, utility bills, mortgage or rental agreements, insurance policy documents, etc. dated the previous year to attach to your application.

To qualify for a low-income discount, applicants must earn less than 60% of the Colorado median income or less than 80% of the Denver-area median income, which is currently less than $62,600 for a household. one person, or $71,550 for a two-person household. Or residents can provide proof of current enrollment in government assistance, such as benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, or the Colorado Low-Income Energy Assistance Program (LEAP).

For more information on accepted documents and other application requirements, visit the city’s electric bike discount site.

How can I claim the discount?

The city one online portal for applications opens at 8 a.m. on the morning of each monthly release date, beginning July 11. Interested Denver residents are encouraged to register for the city ​​newsletter for reminders and updates on monthly discounts.

Applicants will be notified if they are eligible to receive a discount, and the voucher, which will be sent by email, expires after two months.

What e-bike etiquette and other tips should I know?

With great bikes comes great responsibility. Before investing in an e-bike, Bagnall says it’s important to know the basics of general bike maintenance. Improve your knowledge of fixing flats and make sure you have good lubrication for your chain. But one of the advantages of e-bikes is that they are mostly similar to the maintenance of regular bicycles.

Make sure you know the bicycle laws and laws specific to e-bikes. “Watch out for speed limit signs,” says Gordon. “Make sure you don’t pass other riders too fast. Remember that some e-bikes are allowed on certain trails and some e-bikes are not.

Bagnall agrees and insists on not riding carelessly or getting carried away with speed just because you can. Beyond that, he says, have fun and enjoy the ride.

(Read more: What you need to know before hitting the trail with an electric bike)

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Letter: Let’s share the sidewalks with young people on motorized bicycles http://www.cyclingfan.org/letter-lets-share-the-sidewalks-with-young-people-on-motorized-bicycles/ Sat, 09 Jul 2022 03:06:18 +0000 http://www.cyclingfan.org/letter-lets-share-the-sidewalks-with-young-people-on-motorized-bicycles/ When I was eleven, I always wanted to drive my Honda Z50 to the local 7-Eleven for a Mellow Yellow and Sweet Tarts. Or, drive it to school instead of my bike. That Honda could do about 28 mph (what an e-bike is governed to for sale in the US), could have saved my mom […]]]>

When I was eleven, I always wanted to drive my Honda Z50 to the local 7-Eleven for a Mellow Yellow and Sweet Tarts. Or, drive it to school instead of my bike. That Honda could do about 28 mph (what an e-bike is governed to for sale in the US), could have saved my mom from taking me somewhere else, kept me outside instead of playing Atari inside, and would have saved me the trouble of physical exertion. But, I wasn’t old enough to have a license or instruction to ride on public roads, or registration, or insurance.

I could ride it to the “Honda Hills”, which is now Alta Laguna Park. But you were still looking over your shoulder because you weren’t legally allowed to drive a motorized vehicle there.

If only my Honda didn’t have that 50cc internal combustion engine (and felt like a bike), I could have made those trips to the store and school, and not be wary of riding on trails.

At the time, the school’s bike racks were all filled with bikes. Then they all disappeared. I just put it down to parents being wary of predators in this current world. But now that the bike racks are full again, with the e-bikes, I’m not so sure anymore.

Electric bicycles are a wonderful advent for parents and children.

For pedestrians walking downtown though, not so much. They now share sidewalks with young people in motorized vehicles. And likely, these youngsters aren’t interested (or even capable without a speedometer) of tackling 28 mph in a 20 mph zone downtown.
Some models don’t even have pedals, it’s literally a motorized off-road motorcycle on public roads piloted by an eleven-year-old child.

And now that these “Honda Hills” are part of the South Coast Wilderness Area, motorized vehicles are back there too. Although technically not allowed since it is a motorized vehicle, it is not mentioned in the ad I see for local e-bike rentals which touts the “world famous spectacular trails of Laguna”.

All things considered, they’re quiet and less polluting (not zero, fossil fuels are still used to create this energy), and are a great tool. It’s much easier to gloss over that part of having an electric motor, in places that don’t allow motorized vehicles.

Duane Alley, Laguna Beach

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